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    Farnaz Koodak Jahani is a visual artist who was born in Tehran, Iran, in 1986. She graduated from Alzahra University with a B.A. in Visual Communication in 2009. After graduation, she worked as an Art Instructor to help children with disabilities and later experienced working as the in house designer with  National Geographic Magazine Farsi  in Tehran. In 2013, she came to the United States to pursue an M.F.A. degree in illustration from Savannah College of Art and Design. During her educational exploration, she became obsessed with the world of pattern and surface treatment and this simply changed the rest of her journey.  "As an illustrator, I’ve been trained to make my imagination real, thus, I began creating surface design by focusing on narrating my most complicated and momentary feelings through hand painted patterns, which are manipulated with cut lines and layers using laser-cutting technology. Much as life can force unexpected changes, compressing the cut lines forces them to break apart at the surface and interrupt the viewer’s vision. The distorted images introduce new angles to perceive accidental aesthetic, which I call  The   Interrupted Beauties.   My body of work, simply, is a narration of life; it captures the side of life that is full of ups and downs, where there is no definable border between success and failure. I borrowed Iranian symbols, motifs and language to showcase the land I come from as well as my personality. The pieces demonstrate my internal challenge to conquer the discomfort in “everydayness”. I redirect my confusion to achieve an internal peace with my art while expressing my inner side, the side of me that I’m still unconsciously exploring. I find the purest moment of creation is when I’m not planning my pieces or aware of the execution process or even its end result. The most pleasing moment is when the process takes me within and surprises me with its hidden layers, layers that are present in my life as well as in my art.  Although my technique combines a wide range of traditional mediums, including acrylics, watercolor, soft and oil pastels, pen and ink, I recently discovered a way of incorporating technology as a non-traditional medium; using laser-cutting machines to paint my motifs. This high-tech machine allows me to create not only fine art but also unique pieces that are easier to reproduce in the surface design market, a facet of commercial market. The laser-cutting machine raster engraves [1]  my design into a painted surface and makes exact cuts, leaving a brownish burnt tracing behind.  While expressing a distorted vision to my audience might disrupt their solid vision of the world around them; I’m offering them a chance to perceive their surroundings from a new point of view, to discover new layers of thought by directing their eyes to move around and through my ups and downs which are represented by lines and layers. My work is all about the way each of us react toward life’s happenings and survive its chaos. In a way, we are all facing the same world, but looking into that world through different angles to develop our very personal ups and downs."         [1]  Raster engraves refers to a method of marking where laser removes part of the materials away from the surface by burning.   

Farnaz Koodak Jahani is a visual artist who was born in Tehran, Iran, in 1986. She graduated from Alzahra University with a B.A. in Visual Communication in 2009. After graduation, she worked as an Art Instructor to help children with disabilities and later experienced working as the in house designer with National Geographic Magazine Farsi in Tehran. In 2013, she came to the United States to pursue an M.F.A. degree in illustration from Savannah College of Art and Design. During her educational exploration, she became obsessed with the world of pattern and surface treatment and this simply changed the rest of her journey.

"As an illustrator, I’ve been trained to make my imagination real, thus, I began creating surface design by focusing on narrating my most complicated and momentary feelings through hand painted patterns, which are manipulated with cut lines and layers using laser-cutting technology. Much as life can force unexpected changes, compressing the cut lines forces them to break apart at the surface and interrupt the viewer’s vision. The distorted images introduce new angles to perceive accidental aesthetic, which I call The Interrupted Beauties.

My body of work, simply, is a narration of life; it captures the side of life that is full of ups and downs, where there is no definable border between success and failure. I borrowed Iranian symbols, motifs and language to showcase the land I come from as well as my personality. The pieces demonstrate my internal challenge to conquer the discomfort in “everydayness”. I redirect my confusion to achieve an internal peace with my art while expressing my inner side, the side of me that I’m still unconsciously exploring. I find the purest moment of creation is when I’m not planning my pieces or aware of the execution process or even its end result. The most pleasing moment is when the process takes me within and surprises me with its hidden layers, layers that are present in my life as well as in my art.

Although my technique combines a wide range of traditional mediums, including acrylics, watercolor, soft and oil pastels, pen and ink, I recently discovered a way of incorporating technology as a non-traditional medium; using laser-cutting machines to paint my motifs. This high-tech machine allows me to create not only fine art but also unique pieces that are easier to reproduce in the surface design market, a facet of commercial market. The laser-cutting machine raster engraves[1] my design into a painted surface and makes exact cuts, leaving a brownish burnt tracing behind.

While expressing a distorted vision to my audience might disrupt their solid vision of the world around them; I’m offering them a chance to perceive their surroundings from a new point of view, to discover new layers of thought by directing their eyes to move around and through my ups and downs which are represented by lines and layers. My work is all about the way each of us react toward life’s happenings and survive its chaos. In a way, we are all facing the same world, but looking into that world through different angles to develop our very personal ups and downs."

 

 

[1] Raster engraves refers to a method of marking where laser removes part of the materials away from the surface by burning.

 

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